The Perfect Boat

A forum for discussion about the Race to Alaska ( http://www.racetoalaska.com )

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Editors
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The Perfect Boat

Post by Editors »

Interesting to consider what might be the "perfect" boat for the R2AK. What we know for sure is that there will be a small trimaran and a Montgomery 15 with a sliding seat rowing system participating.

http://racetoalaska.com/registered-part ... oggle-id-2
The smaller the boat the bigger the adventure.
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Re: The Perfect Boat

Post by Tom Christie »

Well I'm glad you put "perfect" in quotation marks as there is no such thing as perfect especially in a boat.
Any boat is a compromise of many things.
The best boat being the one that meets the needs of the moment.
Wind, seas, crew state etc, etc, etc.
Now it becomes a guessing game.
I love the lack of rules in this race.
Looks like a Tornado may be a preferred boat for the event.
-Tom
Last edited by Tom Christie on Fri Sep 12, 2014 6:17 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The Perfect Boat

Post by scotdomergue »

Take a look at the Wooden Boat Forum, Race to Alaska 2015 thread. It would seem that Dragonfly, Bad Kitty, or some other really hot racing cat is likely to win. None of these has registered yet, but they're talking about it, and could set up rowing positions for enough crew to probably go about as fast under human power as just about anyone else, certainly fast enough given how fast they move with a little wind.

To me it begins to seem that the issue is not the perfect boat to win the $10K (I can't see myself trying to compete with Dragonfly or Bad Kitty!). Rather the question is how to have fun with this and maybe win in class.

So, can some classes be defined sooner rather than later? I've been planning to design and build a boat this fall and winter, and am not sure what to design for . . .
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Re: The Perfect Boat

Post by Editors »

Tom,

We agree of course about no boat being perfect. So much depends also on weather it would seem.

Scott, I agree it's possible that R2AK could end up being more about the races within the race. A certain kind of boat might claim the big prize, but another class might end up being the real story. I anticipate the discussion of class categories will continue as entries come in over the winter. The cool thing is that anyone who finishes first in any of the potential classes will have their name in the record books and will have established the time to beat for future races on the same course.

—Josh
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Re: The Perfect Boat

Post by Editors »

Good to see you're officially signed up, Scot! We know you've got solid experience in these waters. Keep us posted on which boat you end up going with. —Eds

Here's a link to Scot's team:

http://racetoalaska.com/registered-participants/
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Re: The Perfect Boat

Post by JohnT »

I expect that the race to Alaska will involve some rainy, cold weather. Phil Bolger drew up a Birdwatcher type boat called Camper. The drawings show a lot of gingerbread type railing which I would leave off. Apparently only one has been built and I seem to recall reading that it was overpowered. I would be inclined to put a balanced lug rig on one rather than the cat-gaff rig PCB drew, with a little less sail area. Operating from inside an enclosed cabin certainly sounds attractive on a rainy, cold day.
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Re: The Perfect Boat

Post by scotdomergue »

I'm currently working on design of a tri, under 20 feet LOA, very light, with small cabin so one can sleep comfortably (or navigate, fix food, etc.) while the other sails or rows (the amas will move in close to the main hull for rowing).

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Re: The Perfect Boat

Post by simeoniii »

CLC's Faering Cruiser, slightly modifed, might make a contender.
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Re: The Perfect Boat

Post by Landrith »

I have been reading about CLC's faering cruiser when researching a plywood Oselvar fearing. There are a lot of CLC designs that I would be interested in for this race, but the faering cruiser and the expedition type kayaks with the full sleeping berth are a new kind of minimalist cruiser that open the possibility up of shifts for two crew in what would otherwise be a narrow easily driven under oars hull for one person.

I probably cannot make it to the race, but the form factor of a winning boat has been intriguing. I have been trending toward a one person monohull craft with rowing potential that was primarily an upwind sailing machine. I have a Thistle but with one person, a steady two knots with that beam loaded with some supplies is all I could hope to achieve. An obsolete Star would be even less efficient to row with the ballast keel but may have the light air upwind ability that would more than make up for the difference and against optimal rowing boats. My Windmill Class dinghy with my weight only leaves 40 pounds of supplies before crossing the combined design crew weight, however gives me more confidence in rough water and is small enough I can move it around on rocky log strewn beaches.

Looking at the optimum length for a one or two man open water rowing craft with a narrower than 5 ft beam that I could build easily and cheaply to a design that still has the potential to sail fast upwind in light air makes me look at improvising a sliding seat for Suicide Class (also called Development class) designs that were rumored to plane faster upwind than the first Flying Dutchmans. Adding a little more freeboard for cold water gets a Australian Sharpie, or adding minimum ballast and more decking gets a Swedish D-Kanot. But the rowing potential falls off with the ballast.
Last edited by Landrith on Sun Oct 12, 2014 9:34 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: The Perfect Boat

Post by JollyRoger »

There are many good picks for a good boat for the journey.

Rowcruiser with a good sail rig. Could be used solo or dual.

Also a Angus expedition could be a narrower, lighter option. I set one up with a stowable roller reefing 18' sail rig, 16' inflatable, folding, stowable ama's, mirage drive, sleeping area and it did very well. Also rowed well with the ama's folded in.

The new Core Sound MK III's 17' solo or 20' dual if you lean to the side of sailing over rowing.

Just to name of couple of my pics. But...

I believe an experienced crew of two on a 20' fast cat or Tri will win it if they are racing for the 10K and not in it just for the personal victory of completing a challenging Inside passage course during an official race.

Although this race may be just long and tough enough to beat down a Tornado crew or similar. Thus allowing a fast comfortable cruiser to win. Such as a Farrier Tri.
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