What would you do differently?

The place to discuss SCAMP (Small Craft Advisor Magazine Project), our 11' 11" micro minicruiser.

Moderator: Moderator

Post Reply
JimB
New Contributor
Posts: 9
Joined: Thu Sep 03, 2020 1:31 pm

What would you do differently?

Post by JimB »

I have read numerous SCAMP builder's logs and enjoyed looking through the archives of this forum. I have my plans and am getting ready to start my build. I am wondering, for those of you have been down this road already, if you were to do your build again, what would you do differently?

Jim - #579
Rob Hazard
Regular Contributor
Posts: 143
Joined: Fri May 03, 2013 1:01 pm

Re: What would you do differently?

Post by Rob Hazard »

If I were building my SCAMP again, I'd be a little more thorough in sanding before painting. I have some inside corners where the paint is peeling away. apart from that, I'm pretty happy with Puffin.
User avatar
dsimonson
Major Contributor
Posts: 298
Joined: Tue Aug 21, 2012 8:26 pm
Location: Vancouver, BC
Contact:

Re: What would you do differently?

Post by dsimonson »

No specific order, just as they occur to me:

1) centreboard pin and bushings require robustness in design, as well as accuracy in alignment and assembly. My original broke under way (in the open Pacific... yikes!) and my next one jammed because it wasn't aligned correctly. I should start a proper thread on that... (been too busy sailing?).

2) build in the footwell and lazarette during initial construction. It's a lot more work later, and a huge improvement to ergonomics and sailing pleasure.

3) paint inside lockers before gluing down sole, bench tops, decking, and cuddy. Protect the epoxy from UV degradation.

4) reinforce the foredeck. I go up there a lot (putting on sail ties, farting around at anchor, attaching my mooring whips at dock, etc), and the deck oil-cans a bit. Add non-skid to the forward side decks so you can get up there without any drama.

5) add "blocking" inside hollow mast at partners. My birdsmouth sitka mast broke there, entirely operator error, but still disconcerting.

6) one larger sole hatch on centreline under the cuddy. I have two small hatches, and in a heavy rainstorm under sail there's a lot of water pressure on the leeward hatch. That's the lowest part of the boat (without a footwell) when underway, and mine leaks a cup or two of water by the time the squall passes. I use drybags, so probably will never get to that modification. And the footwell mod does alleviate some of the issue, a few tacks and some of the water finds it's way into the well.

A good sound system in the workshop, blues, jazz, and rock on!!!! Get out to the shop every day. Such a blast. (Take lots of pictures, share them with us!!!) Haha...

All the best,
Dale
User avatar
stevecanaga
New Contributor
Posts: 15
Joined: Fri Sep 12, 2014 10:19 pm
Location: Olympia (new), Washington

Re: What would you do differently?

Post by stevecanaga »

I just finished my boat recently so a lot is fresh in my mind. First, I would echo Dale's comments above - especially getting out to the shop every day. I was fortunate to put the footwell in before I got too far and I REALLY like it so far. A few things about tools if you haven't collected them yet, I found the following pretty handy throughout the build and still reach for them from time to time: a Shinto Rasp (I call it my wood eraser because, well, it's about that easy and fast), a couple sizes of hand planes and sharpening stones, a quality random orbital sander, a Japanese (pull) saw, a good belt sander is helpful too. And, if you can afford it, a band saw comes in really handy in a lot of places - get several blades in different sizes.

Most of all, have fun

Steve
#332
...be happy...
Steve Canaga
Scamp #332 (in progress)
JimB
New Contributor
Posts: 9
Joined: Thu Sep 03, 2020 1:31 pm

Re: What would you do differently?

Post by JimB »

Steve/Dale - those are all great ideas, thanks for sharing them. Really good advice about the hatches. I am curious as to what you would recommend be changed on the center pin?

I am also curious about painting the inside of closed lockers. Does the epoxy in a closed space like an under seat locker need protection from UV?

Jim
Rob Hazard
Regular Contributor
Posts: 143
Joined: Fri May 03, 2013 1:01 pm

Re: What would you do differently?

Post by Rob Hazard »

Dale, I am curious about your centerboard pin. You actually broke one? Yikes, that's scary!
My own approach to the centerboard pin was to make it a loose fit in the board's bushing, so the lateral sailing loads on the board would be borne directly by the trunk itself. The pin only serves as a pivot point for the board to swing from.

As to painting the insides of the lockers, I don't think it's necessary, though it does make finding small items a bit easier. I could have saved myself some time and frustration! :)
User avatar
dsimonson
Major Contributor
Posts: 298
Joined: Tue Aug 21, 2012 8:26 pm
Location: Vancouver, BC
Contact:

Re: What would you do differently?

Post by dsimonson »

Rob and Jim, my original CB pin was a stainless bolt (with the threaded part cut off), epoxied to a plywood disc.

Imagecentreboard pin assembly nearing completion by Dale Simonson, on Flickr

In 2019, 5 years and many miles after first splash, I was out off Ucluelet, BC, heading on a solo trip for a week in the Broken Islands on the west coast of Vancouver Island.

I had been beating out of the inlet for a number of hours and the breeze was easing, with the Pacific swells rocking the boat gently, the CB making its usual clunk, clunk, when there's not enough wind to press the board against the side of the trunk. I was looking at the chart for a good spot to tuck in for the night, as I didn't have enough daylight left to make the crossing to the Broken Group, when all of a sudden the clunk was a different pitch, and then no clunk at all...I was going sideways... my CB had dropped right out of the trunk. It was trailing along below the boat only held by it's lifting pennant. Dropped the sail, deployed the oars and rowed to the nearest cove about a 1/4 mile away. Very slow going as the board fishtailed below me, it took a full hour to go the distance! Pulled up on a bit of gravel, jumped out, cut the pennant and got the board on board. Rowed out to the bull kelp, dropped the hook, and had whiskey for dinner.

Next morning, it was a downwind run back into Ucluelet Inlet, and haul out for repairs. So much for the Broken Group... they're still on my list.

The big blob of epoxy holding the head of the bolt onto the 9mm Okoume plywood disc was still just fine, but the plywood failed, the epoxy had pulled the top laminate off, and the pin backed out. My pin inserts from inside the the water ballast tank... no big deal, really, (no water in the boat), except for the shock of it letting go, and the possibility of being in a bad spot.

I believe the play in the board in light air, clunk clunk, eventually stressed the ply enough to delaminate. (I could be wrong, that's just my guess.)

Making the story short, I replaced the plywood disc with a stainless plate welded to the bolt. Later, I added cheeks to the top of the CB to reduce the play within the trunk (hoping to reduce the clunk clunk). I also replaced the bushing in my CB, but I didn't get my alignment correct and the board jammed. Bored the bushing in the CB a bit oversize, so now the board goes up and down just fine. But I have that clunk clunk back... somewhat reassuring I suppose... grrrr.... I was trying to get rid of that!

Sorry no pics of the whole thing... I have them but not handy at the moment.

Cheers,
Dale
pocketyacht
Recognized Old Salt
Posts: 913
Joined: Wed Oct 20, 2010 6:00 pm
Location: Micronesia and Japan
Contact:

Re: What would you do differently?

Post by pocketyacht »

A suggestion for builders and those currently sailing their boats.
On #2 and other SCAMP's I have built I did this to ensure there was no working and clunking of the centerboard in the trunk.
1. Carefully measure the width of the trunk and the width of your board. Determine the potential space between board and trunk sides.
2. I then purchase a thin plastic kitchen cutting board and cut out the number of 10" round discs that will act as washers to fill most of the space. Then I make holes in the center of the plastic discs large enough to accept the centerboard pin.
3. I then masking tape these to each side of the board aligning the holes.
4. Put the board back in the trunk leaving the tape, which simply wears away from use. Without taping the discs it will not be possible to install the board with discs.
5. These discs not only snug up the board they also make raising the board easier due to water and plastic creating a smooth surface both sides of the board.
Post Reply