question about footwell

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lhav
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question about footwell

Post by lhav »

Hi all. My brother and I, both old grampas, are building #560 in the North Texas heat.

Our kit includes the extra bulkhead to form the footwell. I've read that this piece goes 18" aft of Bulkhead #5, which would correspond with the size of the sole pieces in our kit.

Does the footwell inself require a floor doubler? If so, I have a sheet of 4 mm okoume from a previous canoe project I could cut the doubler out of. Is one layer of 4 mm enough, or would two layers be better?

Thanks in advance for any pertinent info. Thus far this has been a fascinating project.

- Lee H., Wichita Falls TX
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dsimonson
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Re: question about footwell

Post by dsimonson »

Hi Lee,

Not an expert by any means, but I believe the recommendation is a 9mm doubler on the bottom of the footwell. I'd use two layers of that 4mm you have.

All the best,
Dale
"storing a Gartside, and sailing Luna" #162!
dalesimonson.ca | photos on Flickr
bei.beckers
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Re: question about footwell

Post by bei.beckers »

Hi,

as the Scamps bottom isn't parrallel to the seats i'd just keep the floor like it is and make some large fillets in the corners. Then i'd attatch a grate which takes the load close to the fillets, so the bottom is free of load in the middle (where it may not be stiff enough). That keeps your feet parrallel to the seats and with just a little water in the ship it keeps the feet dry: A sufficient increased comfort (the bench is really low, i often have backpain after sailing...

An additional feature is to add a drain valve (screw) in e.g. the portside coner to the water ballast tank with a cutout in the grate. This gives you the possibility to bail out water till the bottom if needed and when you finish sailing (or at least having your Scamp somehere on land) water can find it's way out through this dain hole via the open drain in the (empty, of course) water ballast tanks botton.

cheers, Martin
phatguppy
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Re: question about footwell

Post by phatguppy »

Hi Lee, I'm an older guy building Scamp #558 from a kit, that practically makes us boat-building cousins. I am opting to not double the footwell to keep weight in check and will apply a nice fillet and fiberglass tape around all edges of the footwell. I'll make a grate out of spare wood for the bottom, which will keep the feet drier, and will assess adding a small electric bilge pump after getting into the bay. If the SCAMP is a "wet" boat in heavy wind, I'll add the bilge pump for safety.

Mahalo, David
bei.beckers
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Re: question about footwell

Post by bei.beckers »

Hi Guys,

no worries: the cabin and the high sides are keeping nearly all water outside. Scamp is a remarably dry boat i'd say. What you have to consider is what to do after capsizing. The footwell picks a lot of additional water, maybe 100 liter. After a triple capsize last season (my fault: i didn't reef...) i decided to add 2 holes at the stern ca. 3 inch above waterline in order to have a handgrip when in the water but -thats even more important- to get most of the water out again before re- entering.

cheers, Martin
phatguppy
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Re: question about footwell

Post by phatguppy »

Thanks Martin, do you have a photo of your transom holes? Are these big holes in the transom above the waterline, or a small hole with a drain plug? I can see in a capsize that there would be a lot of water, and weight, in that footwell!
lhav
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Re: question about footwell

Post by lhav »

Thanks for the input on the footwell, everybody.

Another question: how much larger could you make the footwell before you started to diminish the boat's designed safety characteristics ? For instance, could you start the footwell all the way back at B6 instead of 18" aft of B5?

( @ David, I see you're a fan of outrigger canoes. Mine is a Pacific 16, oddly enough manufactured on the Florida Atlantic coast. )
bei.beckers
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Re: question about footwell

Post by bei.beckers »

Hi,
i didn't cut the holes yet, so no pics...
The Question is if it is wise to cut holes like the with a footwell because you get a lot more water inside in the event of a capsize. My advice: build your scamp as you like it, but omit those funny little sink holes au the transom: all water inside will end in the footwell, so they are not useful but make things more complicated.

The additional hand - and- drain holes must be located well above the waterline but are only useful if you can tilt your scamp enough (by pulling your water- filled boat after righting it up at those holes when swimming in the water at the transom) to get the most of it out. To get this go, the water must cover the holes well- otherwise there is a risk to get even more water in... Just try it out. Capsize your boat and right it up. Watch, how much water stays inside. Test by pushing your weight on the transom, how far the water rises. Added holes are anything but helpful if this water is BELOW or at least close to the waterline then... I hope i was able to explain this...my Englisch, you know...
cheers, Martin
Rob Hazard
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Re: question about footwell

Post by Rob Hazard »

I don't think the size of the footwell has much to do with how much water comes aboard in a capsize. That water volume is controlled by the watertight volume of the bench seats, and the revised, narrower opening in bulkhead #4. Look at any of the photos of Howard doing practice capsizes to see what I mean.

I find that most of the water that comes aboard with the boat on its side winds up in the footwell when the boat is righted. That's fine with me, as it's relatively confined there, not sloshing about, and I can bail it out at my leisure.

FWIW: My footwell measures ~18" fore & aft.
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